/ Bibelots
Bibelots
Eric Faggin, Sam Baron
15 February, 2006

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Contributors: Fabrica Industrial Design Dept.

Man’s drive to create is unlimited, and as modern products begin to flood our homes and lives, the objects that once occupied a space in our homes are finding themselves replaced. When replaced, these objects leave a void. Not only do they leave a void of space, but a generational void, a gap between that which belonged to our generation, and the products that belong to newer generations. A series of objects that take the form of products that once were central in our daily life is proposed as a way to trap our emotions. Stripping the object of its functionality and concentrating only on the form, the bulk of space that the object occupies, gives it a new existence. The series is proposed in ceramic, a traditional, primitive, and pristine material. The objects thus continue to exist in our homes, but as ghosts trapped in ceramic, holding onto our memory of the object, but limiting our interaction with it to a visual reminder of what that object was, and what it meant in our lives. Objects such as the boom box, the VHS, four wheeled roller skates are nearly obsolete, however, they can find new life and new use, and can continue to communicate to us in our everyday life.