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Luggage Labels

The Golden Age of Travel occurred between 1890 and the outbreak of World War II. In this period, hotels abounded and the various modes of transport reached their glorious apogee. The labels, which were placed on luggage by railroads, steamships or hotels as advertising, beautifully capture the spirit of the era as small reproductions with vivid colours.

luggage-labesl.jpg

Click here to find a varied set of luggage label’s images, and here to read very interesting info in what is probably the first blog devoted to the art of luggage labels.

Originally from
ReBlogged by karol de rueda on Mar 10, 2008 at 05:18 PM | Comments (0)

Italian for Beginners III

nachbare.jpg

The neighbors here in the North of Italy are mostly very old and unsatisfied with you. They will forbid you everything and if you ask why, they will answer, because it is like that. And then you will find notes like that in your apartment, so charming that you can't even be upset with them.

You are asked to pay attention on the noises provoked by transferring chattels or others at night time (one o'clock at night), regarding that I have the luck to occupy the apartment below yours.

Thank you.

Originally from
ReBlogged by christian etter on May 16, 2007 at 11:55 AM | Comments (2)

Italian for Beginners II

rabbia.jpg

Anger
One expresses anger biting your self on the knuckle of a finger,
normally the index finger. It's not necessary to bite for real,
it's enough to point out the movement.

Originally from
ReBlogged by christian etter on May 14, 2007 at 07:10 PM | Comments (0)

Italian for Beginners I

After living two years in Italy, I prepared a little feature about the Italian culture. We start with communication:

dritto.jpg

He's a tough one
The back of the thumb is drawn across the cheek
from ear to mouth, to indicate that the person under
discussion knows the ropes.

From the book "l dizionario dei gesti italiani " by Bruno Munari, 1994.

Originally from
ReBlogged by christian etter on May 14, 2007 at 10:47 AM | Comments (0)

Damn Chinese

Daniel Hirschman did send a link today to a Reuters press release about our wonderful city called Treviso. It goes like this:

The local government of Treviso, in northern Italy, has ordered the city's Chinese restaurants to remove red lanterns from their windows because they look too "oriental".
"It's spoiling the appearance of the city," the head of the council's town planning department, Sergio Marton, told Corriere della Sera daily.
"The Chinese put up all sorts of stuff: lanterns, lions, dragons, there's even one (establishment) that did its whole front in oriental style."
(...)
"Treviso is a city of Veneto and Padania, it's certainly not an oriental city," deputy mayor Giancarlo Gentilini said, justifying the order to take down the lanterns within ten days.

Great.

Originally from
ReBlogged by christian etter on May 8, 2007 at 09:49 AM | Comments (4)

Affordable Europe

Finally New York intellectuals talk about how to go around Europe on a budget, so look forward to more American tourists in our favorite back yard: Venice.

(ok, yes, that came off a bit snobby, but what the hey -- i'm an american, i can say that)

New York Times: Affordable Europe

Anyone up for writing the Venice guide to avoiding tourist traps? I challenge you!!

Note: this article was mentioned to me 4 times since its publication, though I have a feeling we all know a tad bit more about Venice than the author (what 40 euros for a pizza meal? you're joking!), it is still well worth a read.

Originally from
ReBlogged by ann p on Apr 26, 2006 at 04:58 PM | Comments (2)