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« February 2006 | Main | April 2006 »

March 30, 2006

Benettonplay Flipbook!

http://www.benettonplay.com/toys/flipbook/

Main development of Flipbook! has moved to the newly launched site Benettonplay.

This version comes with user registration, a mayor step required to implement important upgrades to Flipbook! such as advanced editing (being able to save a Flipbook! without publishing to work on it later) and deleting, user ratings, contests and such.

Originally from
ReBlogged by juan ospina on Mar 30, 2006 at 03:50 PM | Comments (27)

"View from my house, go here at least once!"

A very special blog.FABRICA feature brought to you by the collective minds of Fabricanti. As Easter holiday, May Day and the rest of the summer is coming up, you may be wanting to plan your summer travels... so here's a tip of what our backyard looks like from around the world:

From Rune Ricciardelli
"this is what you can see from my house in positano!
everybody should go there once!!!!"

From Daniel Hirschman
Heres a little pic from Southern Africa... Everybody should go there at least once toooooo!

From Federico Urdanata
this is what you can see from my house in bogota!
everybody should go there once!!!!

(and lots more after the break!)

Continue reading ""View from my house, go here at least once!""

Originally from
ReBlogged by ann p on Mar 30, 2006 at 01:37 PM | Comments (0)

How to make your own podcast

I was recently asked by some Fabricanti about podcasting, what it is and how to make one. So here are a list of online how-tos that show you how to podcast your own music or audio files. This post is meant to be a starting point for the beginners, and if you find more resources, please contribute in the comment section.

Podcasting in a nutshell:
Podcast is a way to distribute audio and video content using RSS feeds. By subscribing to the RSS feed, the users' computer will automatically download new content without the user having to actively go to the website and active search for new content. The podcast files are then available for the users to listen (or watch) on their computer when they want, however they want. Podcasts are usually updated periodically. The easiest way to find podcast channels is to use the iTunes podcast library.

How to podcast audio files:
1. Using Blogger with Feedburner - for the total newbies (free service, super easy to set up, check this out if you don't have your own server)

2. Using Wordpress (if you are already familiar with Wordpress, this is easy as cake)

3. Enclosure, MovableType's podcast plugin. This is probably the most complicated out of the three, but if you already have an MT powered blog, this plugin makes it handy to add podcast as part of your existing blog.

Video files can also be podcasted using methods 2 and 3 above, and alternatively, here's a free software that lets you set up your own video podcast channel in seconds: Broadcast Machine.

Originally from
ReBlogged by ann p on Mar 30, 2006 at 11:26 AM | Comments (3)

Art takes the bus. A social intervention in Rome.

UNDERGROUNDS - SOTTOSUOLI

Two buses customized with panels for a travelling installation and 18 artworks, including videos and photos have toured throughout Rome presenting the initiative “undergrounds”. This project created by the artists Pablo Echaurren and Alexander Jakhnagiev focusing on borderline lives is devoted to the world of tramps and homeless people. Starting March 27th, these two art buses have visited public schools in Rome, promoting this socially conscious artistic initiative. "Undergrounds", curated by Echaurren and Jakhnagiev is divided into two sections.

Continue reading "Art takes the bus. A social intervention in Rome."

Originally from
ReBlogged by silvia on Mar 30, 2006 at 11:05 AM | Comments (1)

Gaming for Change

In the same vein as Sarah’s recent post, Wired News points out two new competitions for game developers with a mission to use their powers for good. The first comes from a partnership between the USC Annenberg School for Communication and The State Department. The Reinventing Public Diplomacy Through Games Competition seeks to improve America’s reputation abroad. To compete, game designers must create or modify an existing massively multiplayer online game (MMOG) “incorporating the fundamental characteristics of public diplomacy.”

Early research has confirmed that within these spaces, there is a unique opportunity to create, foster and sustain intercultural dialogue and that perception of national values, ideals, and character are both reinforced and altered by the real time interactions that occur in these spaces. – from uscpublicdiplomacy.com.

The second contest mentioned in the article is mtvU’s Darfur Digital Activist competition. The contest drew 12 viral video game submissions to spread the word about genocide in Sudan. Voting is now closed but you can still play the 4 finalist games on the website. The winning game (to be announced soon) will receive completion funds and be launched to the public this Spring.

(Posted by Micki Krimmel in QuickChanges at 10:23 PM)

Originally from
ReBlogged by ann p on Mar 30, 2006 at 03:43 AM | Comments (0)

March 29, 2006

Workaholic?

This is funny. In case you're wondering, it's Thai.


Originally from
ReBlogged by ann p on Mar 29, 2006 at 03:22 PM | Comments (1)

Disco Bar

An LED table top, very impressive indeed...

The Disco Bar!

Originally from
ReBlogged by ann p on Mar 29, 2006 at 01:23 PM | Comments (0)

Best Skylines in the World

Someone ranked all of the skylines he's studied and put up a really cool page: 15 Best Skylines in the World.

My hometown Chicago came in second, after Hong Kong.

chicago.jpg

My other hometown New York City came in forth, followed by my fantasy hometown Tokyo. Some of these photos don't look too real, and I had no clue that Shenzhen had candy colored buildings!

Originally from
ReBlogged by ann p on Mar 29, 2006 at 11:42 AM | Comments (226)

Gaming for Change

In the same vein as Sarah’s recent post, Wired News points out two new competitions for game developers with a mission to use their powers for good. The first comes from a partnership between the USC Annenberg School for Communication and The State Department. The Reinventing Public Diplomacy Through Games Competition seeks to improve America’s reputation abroad. To compete, game designers must create or modify an existing massively multiplayer online game (MMOG) “incorporating the fundamental characteristics of public diplomacy.”

Early research has confirmed that within these spaces, there is a unique opportunity to create, foster and sustain intercultural dialogue and that perception of national values, ideals, and character are both reinforced and altered by the real time interactions that occur in these spaces. – from uscpublicdiplomacy.com.

The second contest mentioned in the article is mtvU’s Darfur Digital Activist competition. The contest drew 12 viral video game submissions to spread the word about genocide in Sudan. Voting is now closed but you can still play the 4 finalist games on the website. The winning game (to be announced soon) will receive completion funds and be launched to the public this Spring.

(Posted by Micki Krimmel in QuickChanges at 10:23 PM)

Originally from
ReBlogged by ann p on Mar 29, 2006 at 11:28 AM | Comments (2)

Bordergames

bg07.jpg As far as innovative uses of technology go, video games have become one of the most creative and accessible tools available for fostering sociocultural understanding. Though the idea has been around for a while, games are much more complex and their applications broader than ever before.

One of the more recent to come to our attention is Bordergames, which simulates the experience of living as a young immigrant in Lavapies, the "barrio bajo" of Madrid. The game was created by a group of activist artists from Lavapies who call themselves "La Fiambrera Obrera."

What makes Bordergames particularly unique is the design and development of the project. The game is not a finished product, but a continually evolving collaborative process. As constructive contributions come in from both the local immigrant youth, and the online players, the scenarios in the game change. As such, it becomes a creative medium for cultural exchange between people situated in these simulated circumstances, and a globally networked community of players. La Fiambrera Obrera is expected to develop several new versions of Bordergames for other regions around Europe.

via

(Posted by Sarah Rich in The Tech Bloom – Collaborative and Emergent Technologies at 06:28 PM)

Originally from
ReBlogged by ann p on Mar 29, 2006 at 11:27 AM | Comments (1)

Everybody is an artist

Museum of Temporary Art (Museo d’Arte Momentanea)
From March 28th
Milano, Porta Genova

Who?
This initiative is organised by Esterni, a social and cultural project which embraces many fields such as culture, art and communication promoting public art and different ways to aggregate people.
What?
Museum of Temporary Art is a performance/event which involves anybody who is interested in taking part to a creative laboratory where you can realize any kind of artworks using different materials without following precise canons or rules. The project particularly engages students, artists, architects, gallery managers, journalists, critics. The participants will form spontaneously artistic groups and the exhibition space will change continuously according to the emergence of new projects created by their interactions.
Museum of Temporary Art represents a new approach to contemporary art which is often considered inaccessible and élitist.
I think that it could be considered a good example of Relational Aesthetics as the artworks are the result of social and individual interaction among “the artists” and their relationships make possible the artworks’ creation.
Where?
Milan, Warehouses of Porta Genova

Silvia Marini

Originally from
ReBlogged by silvia on Mar 29, 2006 at 10:55 AM | Comments (0)

Bangkok's Mega Bridge

bkkmegabridge-1.jpg

bkkmegabridge-2.jpg

When I was visiting my sister in Bangkok during the new year holiday, my taxi driver missed an exit on the freeway which resulted in us having to cross a bridge to make a u-turn. While crossing the Rama IV bridge and thinking to myself, 'man, this bridge is huuuge,' I noticed that there's construction going on for another bridge just up the river. And it looked waaaay bigger just as a construction. "HOLY S***, that other bridge is gunnabe HUMONGOUS!" The taxi driver told me what the construction was for, but he certainly didn't seem impressed by the size of the scaffoldings. He was more concerned about how you'd be able to bypass certain roads. And now I know:

In order to relieve the commercial traffic congestion around the industrial areas of Bangkok Port, Poochao Saming Phrai Road and Suksawat Road the King initiated the idea of a ring road system." Now in construction, the Industrial Ring Road Bridge (aka Mega-Bridge) stretches 13 km and required the demolition of 881 houses and factories and the commissioning of the world's largest moveable scaffolding system.
(vie Eyeteeth)

You can find more about the bridge construction from 2Bangkok.com and check out more photos at the construction press release.

Originally from
ReBlogged by ann p on Mar 29, 2006 at 10:06 AM | Comments (1)

Bordergames

bg07.jpg As far as innovative uses of technology go, video games have become one of the most creative and accessible tools available for fostering sociocultural understanding. Though the idea has been around for a while, games are much more complex and their applications broader than ever before.

One of the more recent to come to our attention is Bordergames, which simulates the experience of living as a young immigrant in Lavapies, the "barrio bajo" of Madrid. The game was created by a group of activist artists from Lavapies who call themselves "La Fiambrera Obrera."

What makes Bordergames particularly unique is the design and development of the project. The game is not a finished product, but a continually evolving collaborative process. As constructive contributions come in from both the local immigrant youth, and the online players, the scenarios in the game change. As such, it becomes a creative medium for cultural exchange between people situated in these simulated circumstances, and a globally networked community of players. La Fiambrera Obrera is expected to develop several new versions of Bordergames for other regions around Europe.

via

(Posted by Sarah Rich in The Tech Bloom – Collaborative and Emergent Technologies at 06:28 PM)

Originally from
ReBlogged by ann p on Mar 29, 2006 at 05:27 AM | Comments (0)

March 28, 2006

Worldmapper

Their tagline: "Worldmapper: The world as you've never seen it before"

If you really think about it, that's quite easy to say about everything. Even the normal world map that we've all come to use as navigation reference isn't quite exactly like how we see it with our own eyes. However, this project does have some interesting statistics, if you're the kind of person who wonders about the world at large. It actually reminds me very much of the big spread in the Colors #4 issue that reconfigured the world map according to the population (thus India was way huge) and GNP (which made Japan and the US five times larger) -- tho I have to admit that the Colors' maps looked much better, more impressive, and made a bolder statement in print, but good design usually start with good information. so here's to good information.

Worldmapper's land area (regular map as we know it)

Worldmapper's population

Browse all 56 different maps here

Originally from
ReBlogged by ann p on Mar 28, 2006 at 05:19 PM | Comments (6)

Death by iPod

Tweaking iPod are are not something new, by these customized iPod posters definately caught our eye. The skulls fit perfectly and even the earplugs are in place with a little drop shadow. The location: Wismarplatz (friedrichshain) in berlin, germany

deathpod1.jpg

deathpod2.jpg

(thanks, wolf)

I figured Andy Rementer would love this...

Originally from
ReBlogged by ann p on Mar 28, 2006 at 03:57 PM | Comments (1)

Flipbook! of the week

fotw.gif

Now, i know that i have featured Mariepomme in the past, but her newer animations are worth taking notice.

Each one impecable, short and not without some humor. I specially liked "home sweet home", kinda reminds me of a hot summer day after work. I look forward to that... actually...

So please lets give the girl a vote or two, she deserves it big time.

Originally from
ReBlogged by juan ospina on Mar 28, 2006 at 10:23 AM | Comments (4)

Beckoning Mars with Idioms

Idiom01

I've seen some photos of this book tower but had not heard much about the artist, Matej Kren, and his reasons for building it. Was it simply an attempt to break a Guinness World Record or was the tower, as I suspected, a shrine to his Martian overlords, whom he was at last beckoning down to fulfill their long-delayed master plan of destroying all of planet earth (but they were thwarted just in time, when the tower was disassembled a day early)?

Surprisingly, neither is true (according to Kren...). I was also surprised to learn that there have been at least three of these book towers built so far... one in Sao Paolo, one in Prague and one in Jerusalem. I'm not sure how many more. Kren contructs the towers from books published in the country in which one is to be built. And so the works absorb a local context, integrating the content, history and vernacular of that country's local culture. Ergo and so forth and... that's why he's titled his multiple work concept Idiom.

Idiom02

Though Idiom was Kren's first (and most recent) book sculpture, he's created a number of variations on the theme. Click on the small photos to take a look.

And if you have more info on Kren and his beckoning towers, please let me know.

Idiom4

Idiom03

Idiom06

Passage Description – Matej Kren
Tallest book tower in... Malaysia?

Originally from
ReBlogged by ann p on Mar 28, 2006 at 10:06 AM | Comments (3)

Death by iPod

Tweaking iPod are are not something new, by these customized iPod posters definately caught our eye. The skulls fit perfectly and even the earplugs are in place with a little drop shadow. The location: Wismarplatz (friedrichshain) in berlin, germany

deathpod0.jpg

deathpod1.jpg

deathpod2.jpg

deathpod3.jpg

(thanks, wolf)

Originally from
ReBlogged by ann p on Mar 28, 2006 at 09:57 AM | Comments (0)

Techno Tuesday

3_28_06.jpg

Originally from
ReBlogged by andy rementer on Mar 28, 2006 at 08:31 AM | Comments (5)

March 27, 2006

Maximum security at Magasin3 in Stockolm


From the press release: The artist Fabrice Gygi places riots barricades at museums, hangs up bombs so that they resemble chandeliers, and makes a provisional voting booth for an undecided nation. Artist Fabrice Gygi has compared himself to a figurative painter in that he copies objects that he observes in the world around him. Gygi uses their characteristics in forms and materials but displaces their function and context. At Magasin 3, the rooms are filled with sculptures in industrial and military materials such as stainless steel, tarpaulin, and tension straps.
Gygi critiques authoritarian systems in our culture by studying everyday architecture and ordinary objects. He questions the police's preparations ahead of expected riots and our obsession with feeling secure. Fabrice Gygi was born in Switzerland in 1965. He lives and works in Geneva. The solo show at Magasin 3 Stockholm Konsthall is his first exhibition in the Nordic countries.

Until 28 May 2006
Magasin 3
Stochkolm Konsthall

Originally from
ReBlogged by silvia on Mar 27, 2006 at 04:31 PM | Comments (5)

Bird Flu

cagol.jpg


Bird flu is “A mental and physical trip into the center of Europe, between real and unreal fears, physical and mental influences".
A white and aseptic truck will move through the European cities, and will stop in front of involved art spaces and meaningful places. On its sides the big words "bird flu" will be positioned. Around the truck and during hours of stop in every city, there will be the distribution of a series of 5000 badges with the combinations of some words with the "flu" term: like "Art Flu, Ass Flu, Politic Flu, Money Flu, Opinion Flu,TV Flu, Dead Flu, Love Flu, Tami Flu, Bird Flu, Star Flu, Peace Flu, Dog Flu, Toy Flu, Sex Flu, Techno Flu, Angel Flu, Boy Flu, War Flu, Religion Flu, Gun Flu, Pig Flu, Pussy Flu, Girl Flu".

Continue reading "Bird Flu"

Originally from
ReBlogged by silvia on Mar 27, 2006 at 04:05 PM | Comments (0)

Wrong

WRONG aims to examine the age-old question of what is wrong and what is right. An examination of the practice of art and curating, WRONG is far from proposing an answer to this question but tries to take the inquiry as a conceptual experiment translated to the conditions and the framework of contemporary visual art. Read more

Exhibition : Wrong
From 24th March to 19th June 2006
Berlin Germany

Originally from
ReBlogged by silvia on Mar 27, 2006 at 03:56 PM | Comments (213)

Pictures from Pimp My Doll Opening

Last Friday, bunch of Fabricanti went to the Venice opening of "Pimp My Doll" show at the Studio Camufo. Here are some pictures, courtesy of Marco Mucig.

IMG_0270  IMG_0272  IMG_0282

IMG_0275  IMG_0273  IMG_0281

more photos to come as the drunken Fabricanti remember to bring their cameras into work...

Originally from
ReBlogged by ann p on Mar 27, 2006 at 02:29 PM | Comments (4)

Documentary of Beautiful Losers

The show Beautiful Losers ended in Milan last weekend, their website now has a video documentary of the show -- with interviews of the creators and story of how the show came about:

beautifullosers.png

Go to their website and click on the "Documentation" link on the bottom to watch the video.

Arrghh! I hate missing a show!

Originally from
ReBlogged by ann p on Mar 27, 2006 at 11:38 AM | Comments (1)

Two more art shows in Milan

So once you're all "designed-out" from seeing too many plastic chairs at the Salone del Mobile, here's a list of new media art stuff that should be worth checking out:

Hublab Gallery
Currently showing work by Limitazero
Hublab Gallery, Via Vigevano 43, Milano
(entrata via Sartirana)
8 Marzo - 10 Aprile 2006

Super Neen Show at the Gallery Pack
Fuoro Buonoparte 60
20121 Milano
7 Marzo - 22 Aprile 2006
map

(via We-Make-Money-Not-Art)

Originally from
ReBlogged by ann p on Mar 27, 2006 at 11:09 AM | Comments (1)

Ready for Salone del Mobile?

We all know the Salone del Mobile is quite overwhelming, besides the fair itself (which moved to Rho-Pero this year, at the newly built exhibition center designed by Massimiliano Fuksas), there are tons of events and openings going on all over the city. So in a search for what to see at the Salone, I found a list of what DesignBoom said is their top 100+ events happening during the Milan Design Week:
http://www.designboom.com/contemporary/milanpreview.html

In addition, DesignNWS will make a daily report from the fair. Here is a handy map of Milan Design Week, and here is a list of events that goes with the map: http://www.designws.com/pagina/06milaanpreview.htm

To get around Milan, it is probably best to take the subway -- here's the metro map and you can also download the Milan Metro map for your iPod here.

* By the way, if you're planning to write reviews for the fair, we can publish it online for Fabrica Art Report. Contact me if you're interested.

Originally from
ReBlogged by ann p on Mar 27, 2006 at 10:02 AM | Comments (2)

Crocodiles in Venice

crocodiles.jpg

Don't miss the trailer of Crocodiles in Venice, a film by Ries Straver.

Originally from
ReBlogged by ann p on Mar 27, 2006 at 09:36 AM | Comments (0)

March 24, 2006

Bringing Street Protest to Cyberspace In Manila

A group of online activists offered an alternative space to protest after the Government violently prohibited the streets and freedom parks to exercise public assembly and practice freedom of speech. The online activists calling themselves BrigadaElektronica electronic disturbance group organized an "electronic sit-in"- bringing street protest actions on cyberspace.
The electronic disturbance group is once again announcing their second electronic sit-in campaign, targeting the Malakanyang website, PNP and Office of the President.
The action officially starts on March 23, 2006, it will last until the first of April. They are inviting everyone to join and occupy the Philippine National Police website for being a rampant human rights violator.
by Manila Indymedia

More info at manila.indymedia.org

Originally from post.thing.net/

Originally from
ReBlogged by silvia on Mar 24, 2006 at 02:28 PM | Comments (4)

The Power of Women

poteredelledonne2.jpg
March 11th - June 11th, 2006
Contemporary Art Gallery, Trento/ Italy

An interesting exhibition about The feminine universe and its position within contemporary society!

Read more

Originally from
ReBlogged by silvia on Mar 24, 2006 at 11:57 AM | Comments (0)

Colombian president uses MySpace for relection campaign?

It's election time again, in my homeland and Mr. Uribe is struggling to push his most controversial move: Reelection. After he managed to change the law about it (Reelection was not allowed), he is running for president. Again.

I don't know how common this is, but it seems they want to appeal to younger people by getting MySpace accounts?

http://www.myspace.com/alvarouribe

and another polititian:

http://www.myspace.com/carlosgaviria

Election time is a travesti.

Originally from
ReBlogged by juan ospina on Mar 24, 2006 at 10:36 AM | Comments (99)

March 22, 2006

Photos: 3rd year since Iraq invasion marked with protests.

Xeni Jardin:

Protests commemorating three years since the US-led invasion of Iraq are documented in photo streams at Flickr and other image-sharing sites. Relevant tags include antiwarprotest, march20, peacemarch, and of course, Iraq.

Shown here, Matthew Bradley's photos of a protest yesterday at the Pentagon. Link. (Thanks, Arnold Edmayer, spotted on DCist).

Below: found on Flickr under the "iraq" tag and shot by Daniel Ross -- evidence that Cartman was here.


Originally from
ReBlogged by ann p on Mar 22, 2006 at 06:20 PM | Comments (2)

In Taiwan, a condo project called "BLOG"

Xeni Jardin: A real estate developer in Taiwan decided to cash in on the coolness associated with the word "blog" by branding a condo project "BLOG." One problem, though: they neglected to register the "myblog.com" domain they stuck all over related ads.

Link to snapshot, and Link to related post on "Taipei Nights" blog, which is not a condo project at all. Neither is BoingBoing, despite the fact that it is my home. (Thanks, Peter and Premshree)

a condo called blog!! why, i should live in it!

Originally from
ReBlogged by ann p on Mar 22, 2006 at 06:19 PM | Comments (4)

Igor Olejnikov

Wowzers. The most difficult thing with posting a link to Igor Olejnikov is choosing which image to use here. Each piece is lush, expressive masterpiece. Don’t miss the little “previous” link on the bottom of the pages — they lead to more and more illustrations.

Thanks, Robin!

Originally posted by Johnny from Drawn!, ReBlogged by Yury Gitman on Mar 21, 2006 at 10:58 AM

Originally from
ReBlogged by ann p on Mar 22, 2006 at 06:13 PM | Comments (0)

coffee art

Img413_321

"How to make hearts, leaves and rabbits with only cream and coffee..." Watch Video

(via make)

someone go do this at Terry

Originally from
ReBlogged by ann p on Mar 22, 2006 at 06:05 PM | Comments (0)

ephemeral cities | sergio belinchon

G

In Spain one can find a linear city all along the coast built for tourism, a section of land that becomes the most crowded region in Europe, but just for a short time. It’s a city for only three months in summer, when thousands of people come looking for the sea and the sun. The rest of the year it becomes a ghost city, a city without any a function, with no people and no services. It has been growing and expanding since the 60's, and it seems it have no end. This is photographic series documents the development of this ephemeral coastal city.

Ephemeral Cities, by Sergio Belinchon

(via meet me in ataxia, baby)

beautiful

Via swissmiss

Originally from
ReBlogged by ann p on Mar 22, 2006 at 06:03 PM | Comments (0)

compu promo

3_2

ples of computer promotional photography sent to newspapers in the 60s and 70s.

(via core77)

nice posture, lady!

Originally from
ReBlogged by ann p on Mar 22, 2006 at 06:02 PM | Comments (0)

The Beastie Boys are Open Source!

The Beastie BoysYou may have heard by now about the ground-breaking Beastie Boys concert documentary Awesome; I Fucking Shot That! Well, if you weren’t lucky enough to catch it at Sundance or SXSW, you may still get your chance for a sneak preview. The film opens in limited cites on March 31 but wouldn’t it be so much cooler to be the first on your block to see it? And what if you could watch it at the same time as thousands of other fans across the country, or at least in your time zone? On March 23, Awesome will be digitally presented at nearly 200 theaters nationwide at 8pm local time through Big Screen Concerts.

I am really excited by the idea of cinema as a national (regional or global) event – moviegoers experiencing the show at the same time as the rest of the country. According to their press release, THINKFilm is pursuing a non-traditional release strategy in keeping with the imaginative style of filmmaking as well as the punk rock nature of the band. Fans who attend the March 23 preview screenings will also see "A Day in the Life of Nathanial Hornblower," a 30-minute David Cross short created specifically for this one-time event, which will then “self-destruct,” never to be seen again (except online, of course).

The Beastie Boys have long been known for their DIY attitudes and support of mix culture. They encourage fans to download samples and a capella tracks from their website to create mash-ups. They took that sentiment one step further in the creating of Awesome; I Fucking Shot That! Awesome is not your average concert film as you may be able to guess from the title. The majority of the footage was shot by fans themselves. At a concert at Madison Square Garden, the band handed out 50 Hi8 cameras to fans in the audience with the only instructions: Start the camera at the beginning of the show and don’t stop it until it’s finished. The result is a concert film from the view of the fans themselves and celebrating the concert-going experience. The shots are shaky and grainy and you can’t always see the band. One fan filmed his trip to the bathroom and another documented his successful attempt to get backstage. It’s truly a film about the fans, by the fans, for the fans, and a real model of participatory media. I don’t know about you, but on March 23, I’m fucking going to see this movie!

(Posted by Micki Krimmel in Global Culture – Art, Music, Fashion, and Travel at 10:28 PM)

Via WorldChanging: Another World Is Here

Originally from
ReBlogged by ann p on Mar 22, 2006 at 05:59 PM | Comments (4)

Design Like You Give a Damn

If you care about the future we're building, you ought to own a copy of Design Like You Give a Damn: Architectural Responses to Humanitarian Crises

Now, I'm biased. Co-author Cameron Sinclair is not only a WorldChanging contributor, he's also a close friend. Cameron's been a buddy, an ally, and sometimes a teacher.

But if I'd never met Cameron, Design Like You Give a Damn would convince me that I ought to know him. This book should sit on the desk of every designer, architect and engineer who believes that changing the world is part of her job.

Much of the book centers (as one might expect) on housing and shelter, but other fields (sanitation, planning, etc.) are covered as well, with overviews of illustrative design innovations in each field.

Many of the ideas here will be familiar to WC readers. Barefoot solar engineers, land mine detecting flowers, Hexayurt, Roundabout's PlayPump, the Mine Wolf, Watercone, Anti-Malarial Bednets. But there's plenty of material I'd never before encountered here, and, as an overall resource, it's indespensible.

Indeed, I am more and more convinced that 2006 is going to be the year when worldchanging approaches break big. More and more smart, dedicated people (in a number of fields) are turning their passion, skill and experience to bear on solving our biggest problems. Nothing could be more exciting, or more needed, but one of the challenges we all face now is keeping up with the best work being done in each field. That makes resources like this one all the more critical. Design Like You Give a Damn is worldchanging.

(Posted by Alex Steffen in A Newly Electric Green – Sustainable Energy, Resources and Design at 01:52 PM)

i just love the title, don't you?

Via WorldChanging: Another World Is Here

Originally from
ReBlogged by ann p on Mar 22, 2006 at 05:57 PM | Comments (1)

Photos: 3rd year since Iraq invasion marked with protests.

Xeni Jardin:

Protests commemorating three years since the US-led invasion of Iraq are documented in photo streams at Flickr and other image-sharing sites. Relevant tags include antiwarprotest, march20, peacemarch, and of course, Iraq.

Shown here, Matthew Bradley's photos of a protest yesterday at the Pentagon. Link. (Thanks, Arnold Edmayer, spotted on DCist).

Below: found on Flickr under the "iraq" tag and shot by Daniel Ross -- evidence that Cartman was here.


Originally from
ReBlogged by ann p on Mar 22, 2006 at 12:20 PM | Comments (0)

In Taiwan, a condo project called "BLOG"

Xeni Jardin: A real estate developer in Taiwan decided to cash in on the coolness associated with the word "blog" by branding a condo project "BLOG." One problem, though: they neglected to register the "myblog.com" domain they stuck all over related ads.

Link to snapshot, and Link to related post on "Taipei Nights" blog, which is not a condo project at all. Neither is BoingBoing, despite the fact that it is my home. (Thanks, Peter and Premshree)

Originally from
ReBlogged by ann p on Mar 22, 2006 at 12:19 PM | Comments (0)

Igor Olejnikov

Wowzers. The most difficult thing with posting a link to Igor Olejnikov is choosing which image to use here. Each piece is lush, expressive masterpiece. Don’t miss the little “previous” link on the bottom of the pages — they lead to more and more illustrations.

Thanks, Robin!

Originally posted by Johnny from Drawn!, ReBlogged by Yury Gitman on Mar 21, 2006 at 10:58 AM

Originally from
ReBlogged by ann p on Mar 22, 2006 at 12:13 PM | Comments (0)

coffee art

Img413_321

"How to make hearts, leaves and rabbits with only cream and coffee..." Watch Video

(via make)

Originally from
ReBlogged by ann p on Mar 22, 2006 at 12:05 PM | Comments (0)

ephemeral cities | sergio belinchon

G

In Spain one can find a linear city all along the coast built for tourism, a section of land that becomes the most crowded region in Europe, but just for a short time. It’s a city for only three months in summer, when thousands of people come looking for the sea and the sun. The rest of the year it becomes a ghost city, a city without any a function, with no people and no services. It has been growing and expanding since the 60's, and it seems it have no end. This is photographic series documents the development of this ephemeral coastal city.

Ephemeral Cities, by Sergio Belinchon

(via meet me in ataxia, baby)

Originally from
ReBlogged by ann p on Mar 22, 2006 at 12:03 PM | Comments (0)

compu promo

3_2

ples of computer promotional photography sent to newspapers in the 60s and 70s.

(via core77)

Originally from
ReBlogged by ann p on Mar 22, 2006 at 12:02 PM | Comments (0)

The Beastie Boys are Open Source!

The Beastie BoysYou may have heard by now about the ground-breaking Beastie Boys concert documentary Awesome; I Fucking Shot That! Well, if you weren’t lucky enough to catch it at Sundance or SXSW, you may still get your chance for a sneak preview. The film opens in limited cites on March 31 but wouldn’t it be so much cooler to be the first on your block to see it? And what if you could watch it at the same time as thousands of other fans across the country, or at least in your time zone? On March 23, Awesome will be digitally presented at nearly 200 theaters nationwide at 8pm local time through Big Screen Concerts.

I am really excited by the idea of cinema as a national (regional or global) event – moviegoers experiencing the show at the same time as the rest of the country. According to their press release, THINKFilm is pursuing a non-traditional release strategy in keeping with the imaginative style of filmmaking as well as the punk rock nature of the band. Fans who attend the March 23 preview screenings will also see "A Day in the Life of Nathanial Hornblower," a 30-minute David Cross short created specifically for this one-time event, which will then “self-destruct,” never to be seen again (except online, of course).

The Beastie Boys have long been known for their DIY attitudes and support of mix culture. They encourage fans to download samples and a capella tracks from their website to create mash-ups. They took that sentiment one step further in the creating of Awesome; I Fucking Shot That! Awesome is not your average concert film as you may be able to guess from the title. The majority of the footage was shot by fans themselves. At a concert at Madison Square Garden, the band handed out 50 Hi8 cameras to fans in the audience with the only instructions: Start the camera at the beginning of the show and don’t stop it until it’s finished. The result is a concert film from the view of the fans themselves and celebrating the concert-going experience. The shots are shaky and grainy and you can’t always see the band. One fan filmed his trip to the bathroom and another documented his successful attempt to get backstage. It’s truly a film about the fans, by the fans, for the fans, and a real model of participatory media. I don’t know about you, but on March 23, I’m fucking going to see this movie!

(Posted by Micki Krimmel in Global Culture – Art, Music, Fashion, and Travel at 10:28 PM)

Originally from
ReBlogged by ann p on Mar 22, 2006 at 11:59 AM | Comments (0)

Design Like You Give a Damn

If you care about the future we're building, you ought to own a copy of Design Like You Give a Damn: Architectural Responses to Humanitarian Crises

Now, I'm biased. Co-author Cameron Sinclair is not only a WorldChanging contributor, he's also a close friend. Cameron's been a buddy, an ally, and sometimes a teacher.

But if I'd never met Cameron, Design Like You Give a Damn would convince me that I ought to know him. This book should sit on the desk of every designer, architect and engineer who believes that changing the world is part of her job.

Much of the book centers (as one might expect) on housing and shelter, but other fields (sanitation, planning, etc.) are covered as well, with overviews of illustrative design innovations in each field.

Many of the ideas here will be familiar to WC readers. Barefoot solar engineers, land mine detecting flowers, Hexayurt, Roundabout's PlayPump, the Mine Wolf, Watercone, Anti-Malarial Bednets. But there's plenty of material I'd never before encountered here, and, as an overall resource, it's indespensible.

Indeed, I am more and more convinced that 2006 is going to be the year when worldchanging approaches break big. More and more smart, dedicated people (in a number of fields) are turning their passion, skill and experience to bear on solving our biggest problems. Nothing could be more exciting, or more needed, but one of the challenges we all face now is keeping up with the best work being done in each field. That makes resources like this one all the more critical. Design Like You Give a Damn is worldchanging.

(Posted by Alex Steffen in A Newly Electric Green – Sustainable Energy, Resources and Design at 01:52 PM)

Originally from
ReBlogged by ann p on Mar 22, 2006 at 11:57 AM | Comments (0)

UVA Untitled LED Sculpture

Reporting on Friday Late: Transvision.

UVA

One of my favorite pieces from the transvision night was a responsive LED sculpture by United Visual Artists. Installed in the John Madejski Garden, from afar looked like people worshiping the arrival of an alien spaceship, whilst up close you could feel the warmth of all those LEDs. As you approached it, custom camera tracking software detected your presence and reacted by changing the visuals and booming out some granular synthesis sounds through the large speakers. This project created a great atmosphere in the garden and had an aura about it. For a better explanation, watch the video.

Some questions for Joel Gethin Lewis of UVA…

What was the concept behind the piece?
We really didn’t want to compete with all the work already in the V&A, but
did want to make a comment about the architecture of the space itself. The
garden was a natural choice. We choose LED as a display technology because
its quality of light. Emissive, rather than reflective. An obviously new
thing to contrast against the sense of history evident in the V&A
collections.

We also wanted to make a piece that was aggressive and repelled people, one
that forced people to engage with the position in the space, and their
relation to the monolith.

2001 was also an obvious inspiration!

How does the software work?
Using the latest generation of our in-house software system we linked the
LED display, a 2D camera and an audio system. Analysing the live video from
the camera allowed us to see the relative position of the closest person to
the front of the monolith. In this way we could trigger differing
combinations of light and sound.

Did you notice anything about peoples reactions or behaviours that you
didn’t expect to see?

Crowd control was a major issue. At the beginning of the night, when it was
quieter, it was great to see some young kids playing with the system. They
have no expectations or fear of technology, so it was great to get
un-polluted testing from them. It was also fascinating to see the learning
process, how people came up with explanations for the system and how they
communicated it to peers. Its always difficult to deal with large groups of
people.

More information.

Originally from
ReBlogged by ann p on Mar 22, 2006 at 11:49 AM | Comments (3)

March 21, 2006

Techno Tuesday

3_21_06.jpg

Originally from
ReBlogged by andy rementer on Mar 21, 2006 at 10:33 AM | Comments (7)

March 20, 2006

Introducing the Unofficial Fabrica Podcast (UFP)

We inaugurate our very first podcast ever with a video that shows what life at Fabrica is all about - from our drunken xmas party that took place in the building on a cold december night (2005):

Video edited by Barbara Kunst

FabParty.png

Download Video

You can subscribe to UFP using this rss feed:
http://2005to2007.fabrica.it/blog/podcast.xml

** This is our podcasting experiment, we do not guarantee frequent updates or intelligent content, but we will try our best **

(Find instruction of how to subscribe using iTunes in the full entry.)

Continue reading "Introducing the Unofficial Fabrica Podcast (UFP)"

Originally from
ReBlogged by ann p on Mar 20, 2006 at 02:32 PM | Comments (2)

Leo Villareal's LED Tube

Since we're LED fanatics and posted about UVA's LED sculpture recently, here's another cool LED piece made to look like neon bulbs by Leo Villareal:

Via Cool Hunting

Originally from
ReBlogged by ann p on Mar 20, 2006 at 11:00 AM | Comments (208)

March 17, 2006

Pimp My Doll, Next Friday

flyerpimpdoll.jpg

Opening:

Friday 24 March 2006
19:00

@ Studio Camuffo
Cannaregio 4132, Venezia
+39 041 522 9757

http://www.pimpmydoll.net

** Featuring our very own Andy Rementer of Techno Tuesday!!! **

Also reprezentin' from Fabrica: Grisha Morgenstern and Paolo Princi

Originally from
ReBlogged by ann p on Mar 17, 2006 at 03:41 PM | Comments (0)

Beukelsblauw RIP

Sad to read on trendbeheer that Beukelsblauw , by Florentijn Hofman (the artist who paints street in yellow and makes inflatable rabbits), has been demolished.

auw_web.jpg

Beukelsblauw was a temporary urban artwork since 2004 and right from the start it had been decided that it would only remain until a new plan was developed for the ground.

Images of the demolition on "feeling blue."

speaking of ephemeral art...

Originally from
ReBlogged by ann p on Mar 17, 2006 at 10:57 AM | Comments (3)

Charcoal Paintings By Jorge Rodriguez in the Center of Madrid

charchol1.jpg

(more pics at wooster collective's post -- click the title link)

The amazing thing about these peices by Jorge Rodriguez are that with the rain and the wind they will disappear.

The photos are by Socayo.

Originally from
ReBlogged by ann p on Mar 17, 2006 at 10:55 AM | Comments (3)

the logos of the web 2.0

Web_20_logos

Ludwig Gatzke’s compiled nearly 400 Web 2.0 logos. WOW!

Click here for a breakdown of the fonts used in some of the fontshop's favorite brands.

(via design*notes)

this reminds me of logo books

Originally from
ReBlogged by ann p on Mar 17, 2006 at 10:44 AM | Comments (0)

Beukelsblauw RIP

Sad to read on trendbeheer that Beukelsblauw , by Florentijn Hofman (the artist who paints street in yellow and makes inflatable rabbits), has been demolished.

auw_web.jpg

Beukelsblauw was a temporary urban artwork since 2004 and right from the start it had been decided that it would only remain until a new plan was developed for the ground.

Images of the demolition on "feeling blue."

Originally from
ReBlogged by ann p on Mar 17, 2006 at 04:57 AM | Comments (0)

Charcoal Paintings By Jorge Rodriguez in the Center of Madrid

charchol1.jpg

charchol2.jpg

charchol3.jpg

The amazing thing about these peices by Jorge Rodriguez are that with the rain and the wind they will disappear.

The photos are by Socayo.

Originally from
ReBlogged by ann p on Mar 17, 2006 at 04:55 AM | Comments (0)

the logos of the web 2.0

Web_20_logos

Ludwig Gatzke’s compiled nearly 400 Web 2.0 logos. WOW!

Click here for a breakdown of the fonts used in some of the fontshop's favorite brands.

(via design*notes)

Originally from
ReBlogged by ann p on Mar 17, 2006 at 04:44 AM | Comments (0)

March 16, 2006

Art is Advertising or Advertising is Art?

neterotropia.gif

16/03/06 - 31/03/06
Paris- Palais de Tokyo, Milan Careof, Antwerp NICC

Neterotopia is an event that takes place in various spaces on the Net and in 3 different exhibition spaces.. Eleven artists from different countries have been invited to choose an Internet site and use the spaces usually reserved for advertising.
Artists and websites Christophe Bruno www.liberation.fr , Ghazel www.sortiraparis.com, Susan Hefuna movies.tenuae.com, Nathalie Hunterhttp:// www.google.com, Yuji Oshima http://www.arman.fm Peter Lemmensand Eva Cardon http://www.wunderground.com, Adam Vackar http://www.inrockutibles.com, Stephen Vitiello www.villagevoice.com, Luca Vitone www.viamichelin.it, Version (Gabriela Vanga, Ciprian Muresan e Mircea Cantor) http://www.corriere.it, 0100101110101101.ORG http://www.film.it.

Originally from
ReBlogged by silvia on Mar 16, 2006 at 04:29 PM | Comments (6)

Spotlight

Spotlight is a project by Orit Zuckerman with Sajid Sadi from MIT Media Lab

spotlight-installation.jpg

Spotlight is an installation of 16 interactive portraits. Each portrait has a set of 9 "temporal gestures" - photographic-quality sequences of human gestures such as "looking up". The portraits are networked, and placed in a 4X4 layout.

Every few seconds, a randomly selected portrait is looking towards a neighboring portrait. In turn, the neighboring portrait will look back. To a viewer of the installation, these "random discussions" create a sense of "social dynamics". The viewer can interrupt the group dynamics at any time, by selecting one of the 16 portraits. The remaining 15 portraits automatically react and direct their attention to the viewer-selected portrait, which reacts with a special gesture - "being the center of attention".

don't miss the video.


Originally from
ReBlogged by ann p on Mar 16, 2006 at 04:07 PM | Comments (3)

UVA Untitled LED Sculpture

Reporting on Friday Late: Transvision.

UVA

One of my favorite pieces from the transvision night was a responsive LED sculpture by United Visual Artists. Installed in the John Madejski Garden, from afar looked like people worshiping the arrival of an alien spaceship, whilst up close you could feel the warmth of all those LEDs. As you approached it, custom camera tracking software detected your presence and reacted by changing the visuals and booming out some granular synthesis sounds through the large speakers. This project created a great atmosphere in the garden and had an aura about it. For a better explanation, watch the video.

Some questions for Joel Gethin Lewis of UVA…

What was the concept behind the piece?
We really didn’t want to compete with all the work already in the V&A, but
did want to make a comment about the architecture of the space itself. The
garden was a natural choice. We choose LED as a display technology because
its quality of light. Emissive, rather than reflective. An obviously new
thing to contrast against the sense of history evident in the V&A
collections.

We also wanted to make a piece that was aggressive and repelled people, one
that forced people to engage with the position in the space, and their
relation to the monolith.

2001 was also an obvious inspiration!

How does the software work?
Using the latest generation of our in-house software system we linked the
LED display, a 2D camera and an audio system. Analysing the live video from
the camera allowed us to see the relative position of the closest person to
the front of the monolith. In this way we could trigger differing
combinations of light and sound.

Did you notice anything about peoples reactions or behaviours that you
didn’t expect to see?

Crowd control was a major issue. At the beginning of the night, when it was
quieter, it was great to see some young kids playing with the system. They
have no expectations or fear of technology, so it was great to get
un-polluted testing from them. It was also fascinating to see the learning
process, how people came up with explanations for the system and how they
communicated it to peers. Its always difficult to deal with large groups of
people.

More information.

Originally from
ReBlogged by ann p on Mar 16, 2006 at 10:02 AM | Comments (0)

Recovery Happens

zoriah_thailand.jpgIn the immediate aftermath of the December 26, 2004, tsunami, we pointed to satellite photos showing the before-and-after of coastal regions of Thailand, Sri Lanka, Indonesia, India and other affected locations. These images were among the most powerful representations of the disaster, as viewers could easily trace the path of destruction. New before-and-after images are now available, but these tell a very different story.

Photojournalist Zoriah covered both Sri Lanka and Thailand in the days following the tsunami; earlier this year, Zoriah returned to Thailand, and took pictures at the exact same sets of locations. WarShooter.com, a web portal for photojournalists covering conflict and disaster, posted the resulting side-by-side comparison this weekend. Some of the changes are subtle, but it's clear that much of Thailand is well on the road to recovery.

John Stanmeyer also posted before-and-after shots, this time of Banda Aceh, Indonesia. Aceh still has much further to go than Thailand, but these images stand as record that human beings can, and will, choose to survive and flourish even in the wake of unthinkable disaster. (Warning: the first image of Stanmeyer's collection includes a fully-visible corpse; the subsequent images aren't nearly as disturbing.)

(Posted by Jamais Cascio in The Means of Expression - Media, Creativity and Experience at 12:12 PM)

Originally from
ReBlogged by ann p on Mar 16, 2006 at 10:00 AM | Comments (0)

Google Mars

google_mars.jpgCombine two WorldChanging obsessions -- online map systems and the planet Mars -- and you have the potential for something that could keep us happily clicking and playing for hours. Google has now unleashed Google Mars, a Google Maps site using satellite imagery of the Red Planet. It's not as powerful as Google Earth, but it's by far the most easily-accessible way to get to know the fourth planet from the sun. (Google suggests that a plug-in to bring Mars data to the Google Earth engine may soon be on its way.)

The site includes three different presentations of the Martian surface:

  • Elevation - A shaded relief map, generated with data from the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) on NASA's Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft. This map is color-coded by altitude, so you can use the color key at the lower left to estimate elevations.
  • Visible - A mosaic of images taken by the Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) on NASA's Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft. MOC is like the digital camera you have at home. Basically, this is what your eyes would see if you were in orbit around Mars.
  • Infrared - A mosaic of infrared images taken by the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) on NASA's Mars Odyssey spacecraft. Warmer areas appear brighter, and colder areas are darker. Clouds and dust in the atmosphere are transparent in the infrared, making this the sharpest global map of Mars that's ever been made.
o view flags pointing out the planet's physical features, as well as the locations of the various landers (both successful and otherwise).

When you first hit Google Mars, you're presented with a colorful elevation map. Blue represents land below the Martian average elevation, rising to green, yellow, and orange, with red representing the higher elevations, and white the peaks of mountains. It's no coincidence that this color range strongly suggests what a lightly terraformed Mars might aspire to look like; the elevation map, despite having the least-realistic colors of the three, does the best job at making Mars look like a world, not just a rocky planet.

The announcement of Google Mars was well-timed; the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) successfully reached Martian orbit on Friday, and when it finishes its months-long aerobraking maneuver (using the Martian atmosphere to slow its speed), it will give us by far the most detailed images of Mars yet. Among MRO's tools are a camera with a resolution of one foot per pixel and a broadband transceiver, giving the Mars science fleet a high-speed orbiting router. Let's hope that Google gets the MRO pictures added to the Google Mars dataset as quickly as they can.

(Posted by Jamais Cascio in Pulling Back the Curtain – Information and Knowledge Resources at 12:44 PM)

Originally from
ReBlogged by ann p on Mar 16, 2006 at 10:00 AM | Comments (0)

Action-figures made from Ethernet cable

Cory Doctorow: This Russian site is filled with pictures of detailed action figures and accessories twisted together from strands of wire unwound from Cat-5 Ethernet cable. Link

Originally from
ReBlogged by ann p on Mar 16, 2006 at 09:50 AM | Comments (0)

Social engineering prank makes athlete choke

Mark Frauenfelder: Bruce Shneier has a great story about some people at California Berkeley who created a fake co-ed named Victoria to chat online with Gabe Pruitt, USC's starting guard.
On Saturday, at the game, when Pruitt was introduced in the starting lineup, the chants began: "Victoria, Victoria." One of the fans held up a sign with her phone number.

The look on Pruitt's face when he turned to the bench after the first Victoria chant was priceless. The expression was unlike anything ever seen in collegiate or pro sports. Never did a chant by the opposing crowd have such an impact on a visiting player. Pruitt was in total shock. (This is the only picture I could find.)

The chant "Victoria" lasted all night. To add to his embarrassment, transcripts of their IM conversations were handed out to the bench before the game: "You look like you have a very fit body." "Now I want to c u so bad."

Pruitt ended up a miserable 3-for-13 from the field.


ier.com/blog/archives/2006/03/basketball_pran.html">Link (thanks, Mark!)

wow!

Originally from
ReBlogged by ann p on Mar 16, 2006 at 09:50 AM | Comments (2)

Insect art festival in London this May through June

David Pescovitz: Fortean researcher Mark Pilkington, of the excellent Strange Attractor Journal, is co-organizing the First International Arts Pestival at the London Wetland Centre May 27-June 4. This looks like it will be an absolutely incredible event. From the description:
Pestival
“If all mankind were to disappear, the world would regenerate back to the rich state of equilibrium that existed ten thousand years ago. If insects were to vanish, the environment would collapse into chaos.”--E.O Wilson

The First International Arts Pestival is dedicated to raising awareness of the integral role insects play in the global ecosystem and in all animal societies. Many of those insects are increasingly endangered through human action.

Through appreciation of “insects in art and the art of being an insect”, the Pestival aims to create positive PR for this 400-million-year-old, highly evolved taxon that has had thousands of years of bad press.

We are building up a fantastic programme of talks, demonstrations, workshops, art installations, films, music and performance, fusing art and science to reach out to a broad, interested audience of homo sapien adults and children.
Mark says, "We're currently seeking entries to our insect photography competition, and looking for short films with entomological themes." Link

Originally from
ReBlogged by ann p on Mar 16, 2006 at 09:47 AM | Comments (214)

Recovery Happens

zoriah_thailand.jpgIn the immediate aftermath of the December 26, 2004, tsunami, we pointed to satellite photos showing the before-and-after of coastal regions of Thailand, Sri Lanka, Indonesia, India and other affected locations. These images were among the most powerful representations of the disaster, as viewers could easily trace the path of destruction. New before-and-after images are now available, but these tell a very different story.

Photojournalist Zoriah covered both Sri Lanka and Thailand in the days following the tsunami; earlier this year, Zoriah returned to Thailand, and took pictures at the exact same sets of locations. WarShooter.com, a web portal for photojournalists covering conflict and disaster, posted the resulting side-by-side comparison this weekend. Some of the changes are subtle, but it's clear that much of Thailand is well on the road to recovery.

John Stanmeyer also posted before-and-after shots, this time of Banda Aceh, Indonesia. Aceh still has much further to go than Thailand, but these images stand as record that human beings can, and will, choose to survive and flourish even in the wake of unthinkable disaster. (Warning: the first image of Stanmeyer's collection includes a fully-visible corpse; the subsequent images aren't nearly as disturbing.)

(Posted by Jamais Cascio in The Means of Expression - Media, Creativity and Experience at 12:12 PM)

Originally from
ReBlogged by ann p on Mar 16, 2006 at 04:00 AM | Comments (1)

Google Mars

google_mars.jpgCombine two WorldChanging obsessions -- online map systems and the planet Mars -- and you have the potential for something that could keep us happily clicking and playing for hours. Google has now unleashed Google Mars, a Google Maps site using satellite imagery of the Red Planet. It's not as powerful as Google Earth, but it's by far the most easily-accessible way to get to know the fourth planet from the sun. (Google suggests that a plug-in to bring Mars data to the Google Earth engine may soon be on its way.)

The site includes three different presentations of the Martian surface:

  • Elevation - A shaded relief map, generated with data from the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) on NASA's Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft. This map is color-coded by altitude, so you can use the color key at the lower left to estimate elevations.
  • Visible - A mosaic of images taken by the Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) on NASA's Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft. MOC is like the digital camera you have at home. Basically, this is what your eyes would see if you were in orbit around Mars.
  • Infrared - A mosaic of infrared images taken by the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) on NASA's Mars Odyssey spacecraft. Warmer areas appear brighter, and colder areas are darker. Clouds and dust in the atmosphere are transparent in the infrared, making this the sharpest global map of Mars that's ever been made.
o view flags pointing out the planet's physical features, as well as the locations of the various landers (both successful and otherwise).

When you first hit Google Mars, you're presented with a colorful elevation map. Blue represents land below the Martian average elevation, rising to green, yellow, and orange, with red representing the higher elevations, and white the peaks of mountains. It's no coincidence that this color range strongly suggests what a lightly terraformed Mars might aspire to look like; the elevation map, despite having the least-realistic colors of the three, does the best job at making Mars look like a world, not just a rocky planet.

The announcement of Google Mars was well-timed; the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) successfully reached Martian orbit on Friday, and when it finishes its months-long aerobraking maneuver (using the Martian atmosphere to slow its speed), it will give us by far the most detailed images of Mars yet. Among MRO's tools are a camera with a resolution of one foot per pixel and a broadband transceiver, giving the Mars science fleet a high-speed orbiting router. Let's hope that Google gets the MRO pictures added to the Google Mars dataset as quickly as they can.

(Posted by Jamais Cascio in Pulling Back the Curtain – Information and Knowledge Resources at 12:44 PM)

Originally from
ReBlogged by ann p on Mar 16, 2006 at 04:00 AM | Comments (0)

Action-figures made from Ethernet cable

Cory Doctorow: This Russian site is filled with pictures of detailed action figures and accessories twisted together from strands of wire unwound from Cat-5 Ethernet cable. Link

Originally from
ReBlogged by ann p on Mar 16, 2006 at 03:50 AM | Comments (0)

Social engineering prank makes athlete choke

Mark Frauenfelder: Bruce Shneier has a great story about some people at California Berkeley who created a fake co-ed named Victoria to chat online with Gabe Pruitt, USC's starting guard.
On Saturday, at the game, when Pruitt was introduced in the starting lineup, the chants began: "Victoria, Victoria." One of the fans held up a sign with her phone number.

The look on Pruitt's face when he turned to the bench after the first Victoria chant was priceless. The expression was unlike anything ever seen in collegiate or pro sports. Never did a chant by the opposing crowd have such an impact on a visiting player. Pruitt was in total shock. (This is the only picture I could find.)

The chant "Victoria" lasted all night. To add to his embarrassment, transcripts of their IM conversations were handed out to the bench before the game: "You look like you have a very fit body." "Now I want to c u so bad."

Pruitt ended up a miserable 3-for-13 from the field.


ier.com/blog/archives/2006/03/basketball_pran.html">Link (thanks, Mark!)

Originally from
ReBlogged by ann p on Mar 16, 2006 at 03:50 AM | Comments (0)

Insect art festival in London this May through June

David Pescovitz: Fortean researcher Mark Pilkington, of the excellent Strange Attractor Journal, is co-organizing the First International Arts Pestival at the London Wetland Centre May 27-June 4. This looks like it will be an absolutely incredible event. From the description:
Pestival
“If all mankind were to disappear, the world would regenerate back to the rich state of equilibrium that existed ten thousand years ago. If insects were to vanish, the environment would collapse into chaos.”--E.O Wilson

The First International Arts Pestival is dedicated to raising awareness of the integral role insects play in the global ecosystem and in all animal societies. Many of those insects are increasingly endangered through human action.

Through appreciation of “insects in art and the art of being an insect”, the Pestival aims to create positive PR for this 400-million-year-old, highly evolved taxon that has had thousands of years of bad press.

We are building up a fantastic programme of talks, demonstrations, workshops, art installations, films, music and performance, fusing art and science to reach out to a broad, interested audience of homo sapien adults and children.
Mark says, "We're currently seeking entries to our insect photography competition, and looking for short films with entomological themes." Link

Originally from
ReBlogged by ann p on Mar 16, 2006 at 03:47 AM | Comments (0)

March 14, 2006

The Venice of Pleasure

New Museum of Erotic Art in Venice

The new exhibition spanning 700 square meters on four floors presents works by past and contemporary artists that include a collection of paintings, illustrations, photographs, sculptures, books and other objects all focusing on the theme of Eros. One among the sections is dedicated to libertine Venice, an uncommon fresco of events and personalities that marked the lesser known aspect of the old Serenissima Republic.

Originally from http://www.aguestinvenice.com/

Originally from
ReBlogged by silvia on Mar 14, 2006 at 05:27 PM | Comments (0)

Techno Tuesday

14_3_06.jpg

Originally from
ReBlogged by andy rementer on Mar 14, 2006 at 09:57 AM | Comments (6)

March 13, 2006

Portable Gallery!

The aptly-named Portable Gallery is, indeed, highly portable. This globally-accessible virtual exhibition space for art, film, and music delivers downloadable files right to your computer at the click of a mouse. Self-described as 'a leading digital arts arena within the young Nordic creative community,' the gallery recently launched Exhibition #003, which includes Danish brothers Rune RK and Johannes Torpe (a.k.a. Artificial Funk) in 'Music Without Instruments,' a work that combines a bicycle, a printer, and a coffee machine in tuneful yet non-traditional ways. There's also Sweden's celebrated art/ fashion photographer Martina Hoogland Ivanow's 'Spectators' series, which turns the camera on the audience in a visual examination of the psychology behind watching. Fans of Norway's notorious artist/ DJ, Cato Canarican, can also enjoy a sampler from his long-awaited second album by visiting the space. Portable Gallery gives 'state of the art' a whole new meaning, by shifting its physical status and bringing it straight to you. - by Peggy MacKinnon

Originally fromRhizome .org

Originally from
ReBlogged by silvia on Mar 13, 2006 at 05:30 PM | Comments (4)

Art and Retail

Deciding how much time to spend shopping and how much to devote to the city's splendid art galleries has long been a dilemma facing visitors to Paris—but with the opening of Espace Louis Vuitton, a gallery housed on the seventh floor of the luxury leather brand's newly renovated Champs-Elysées store, there's a chance to indulge in the chic and the cultural under one roof. Visitors have the option of being taken to the gallery in the all-black elevator pictured here or using a separate entrance at 60, Rue de Bassano. Upon arrival, they can expect to see modern art that blurs the boundaries between self-expression and mere branding. A current exhibition, by New York artist Vanessa Beecroft, features images of female nudes contorted to form (what else?) the letters that make up Louis Vuitton's name. Future exhibitions will revolve around the themes of travel, art and fashion. Purists may deplore this retailer's stab at art curating, but worldly tourists may welcome it as a consummately modern form of multitasking. By David Lau

Originally from the Mar. 06, 2006 issue of TIME Global Advisor

Originally from
ReBlogged by silvia on Mar 13, 2006 at 03:30 PM | Comments (0)

March 11, 2006

Colombian ambassador writes letter to Bruce Willys

bruceinvadecolombia.jpg

'El Tiempo' (Colombia's leading newspaper) reported that Mr. Willys had made some strong comments about Colombia, in an interview for his upcoming movie '16 blocks'. It seems he said that the U.S. should invade Colombia and do 'whatever it takes' to stop drugs traffic. I was unable to confirm this story, since i can't find a single link about it on the Internet (?).

Now, Andres Pastrana (Colombian Ambassador in the U.S. and ex-president, famous for his failed talks with F.A.R.C, among other embarassing things....) has written a letter to Willys, basically inviting him over to show him that 'more than 44 million Colombians fight drugs every day' and that consumption as well production need to be solved, if the war on drugs is to be won.

This is a stupid story but funny still. As a kid, i watched all of Mr. Willy's movies and now.... seeing your childhood heroes act like right-wing ignorant idiots... i feel a bit stupid for liking those movies to being with. I recently re watched 'Commando' with mr. Arnold. talk about single-minded, ridiculous stereotypes....

ANNNnnnnnyway.... this is the link to the letter:

http://eltiempo.terra.com.co/poli/2006-03-10/ARTICULO-WEB-_NOTA_INTERIOR-2786215.html

Originally from
ReBlogged by juan ospina on Mar 11, 2006 at 11:31 AM | Comments (2)

March 10, 2006

When erotism needs a frame

sex.jpg

Sex and Landscapes
by Jane Newton
From 24/2/06 to 4/6/06
Palazzo Reale Milano

The exhibition comprises around ninety pictures selected by the famous photographer Helmut Newton and focuses on nudes and landscapes. Sex & Landscapes brings together a rich selection from Helmut Newton's little-known landscape and travel photographs, as well as unseen "tougher" sex pictures, described by Philippe Garner of de Pury & Luxembourg as "Helmut's world of dark, brooding seas, baroque statuary, crashing waves, a long desert highway under threatening skies, a Berlin park at dusk, enigmatic apartment buildings at night, the Rhine seen from the air, the shadows of airplanes, all this interwoven with hard and voyeuristic sexual imagery, plus a touch of his high style and glamour".

Originally from
ReBlogged by silvia on Mar 10, 2006 at 04:52 PM | Comments (3)

KioskShop Berlin

permanent installation by H. N. Semjon with multiple shop

The Berlin-based artist H.N. Semjon encounters the retail store and the art world in a unique manner through his project "KioskShop berlin". The permanent installation is located in the new gallery district Mitte Nord.
Since the opening last year October it has drawn about 2000 people to its site.
The long term installation simulates, on the one hand, a small neighborhood store. On the other hand, the artwork plays with the perception of and triggers the reflection on the world of consumer products and its marketing, relations of consumption, as well as the social aspect of the neighborhood store.

Read more about KioskShop Berlin

Originally from
ReBlogged by silvia on Mar 10, 2006 at 04:27 PM | Comments (2)

Flipbook! : Bug fix

An important upgrade has been done to the 'maker' page interface on Flipbook!. Note that lines that go offstage will now record correctly as finished (instead of going on even after the mouse button wasn't clicked).

as always, report bugs, annoyances and whishes to

flipbook
at
piterwilson
dot
com

Originally from
ReBlogged by juan ospina on Mar 10, 2006 at 03:17 AM | Comments (4)

March 09, 2006

LIMITLESS : PIEMONTE_SHARE_FESTIVAL | TORINO, 8 - 12 MARCH 2006

The most important date with Italian art, digital culture and new media is back, with its second edition. PIEMONTE_SHARE_2006 runs parallel with the XX Winter Olympic Games in Turin 2006 and kicks off during the Paralympics with the theme "Limitless": breaking down the barriers.

Continue reading "LIMITLESS : PIEMONTE_SHARE_FESTIVAL | TORINO, 8 - 12 MARCH 2006"

Originally from
ReBlogged by silvia on Mar 9, 2006 at 03:44 PM | Comments (0)

Make Your 15 Minutes of Fame

Every Thursday during May, Make Tvwill host a programme of live webcasts curated by Sideshow and created, potentially, by you! Artists are invited to plug in their webcams and beam live to the net for their very own fifteen minutes of fame. An online audience will interact with performers and vote for their favorite broadcasts. Make TV programs will be available online, for 48 hours, to view and download. The project combines a web interface with plug-and-play web streaming technology, meaning no additional software or server costs for the broadcaster, and is designed for anyone with the desire to create live content. The concept was developed by Active Ingredient, a UK company which combines the digital arts with web design and development.
The submission deadline for May's program is Monday, March 20th

Originally from Rhizome.org

Originally from
ReBlogged by silvia on Mar 9, 2006 at 03:33 PM | Comments (4)

March 08, 2006

Image of the day

Oscar nominee Heath Ledger inspired a posse of gay cowboys in Sydney's annual Gay and Lesbian Mardi Gras parade at the weekend.

capt.sge.rnw14.050306221232.jpg

Wearing cowboy hats and riding chaps showing their buttocks, the "Brokeback Mormons" joined 120 floats and thousands of gay pride marchers dancing their way through the streets.

Image. Story.

Originally from
ReBlogged by ann p on Mar 8, 2006 at 04:54 PM | Comments (2)

The Wild Web of China: Sex and Drugs, Not Reform

Unchecked freedoms that exist on the Web despite the government's filtering efforts may be ushering in an age of social change.

Quote from the article:

"Chinese entrepreneurs who started out brazenly selling downloadable pirated music and movies from online storefronts have extended their product lines — peddling drugs and sex, stolen cars, firearms and even organs for transplanting."

"...On any of China's leading search engines, enter sensitive political terms like "Tiananmen Square" or "Falun Gong," and the computer is likely to crash or simply offer a list of censored Web sites. But terms like "hot sex" or "illegal drugs" take users to dozens of links to Web sites allowing them to download sex videos, gain entry to online sports gambling dens or even make purchases of heroin. The scams are flourishing..." (click the header link to go to the article)

Originally from
ReBlogged by ann p on Mar 8, 2006 at 02:32 PM | Comments (0)

Chair tattoos

David Pescovitz:
 History Tattoo 5
Tattoo artist Nick Baxter has done some beautiful needle-and-ink renderings of designer chairs.
Link (via Daddy Types)

no way.

Originally from
ReBlogged by ann p on Mar 8, 2006 at 02:27 PM | Comments (2)

Abortion now a crime in South Dakota

Xeni Jardin: From the BBC news item:
Under the law signed by South Dakota Governor Mike Rounds, doctors could get up to five years in prison and a $5,000 (£2,800) fine for performing an illegal abortion. (...) The organisation Planned Parenthood, which runs South Dakota's only abortion clinic, immediately said it would challenge the new law.

The abortion ban would take effect on 1 July but it is likely that a federal judge would suspend it during any legal challenge.

The law would therefore not take effect unless South Dakota state gets the case to the US Supreme Court and wins.

on the way? Women reading this blog might want to check out this helpful and informative link now, and bookmark this one for later. (via Warren)

Originally from
ReBlogged by ann p on Mar 8, 2006 at 02:24 PM | Comments (90)

Image of the day

Oscar nominee Heath Ledger inspired a posse of gay cowboys in Sydney's annual Gay and Lesbian Mardi Gras parade at the weekend.

capt.sge.rnw14.050306221232.jpg

Wearing cowboy hats and riding chaps showing their buttocks, the "Brokeback Mormons" joined 120 floats and thousands of gay pride marchers dancing their way through the streets.

Image. Story.

Originally from
ReBlogged by ann p on Mar 8, 2006 at 10:54 AM | Comments (3)

Virtual China

Serfing in Internet i've found an interesting blog: Virtual China.
This blog is an exploration of virtual experiences and environments in and about China. It is also the focus of the 2006 Asia Focus research program at the Institute for the Future, a small nonprofit technology forecasting group in Palo Alto, California.

Originally from
ReBlogged by silvia on Mar 8, 2006 at 10:37 AM | Comments (2)

The Wild Web of China: Sex and Drugs, Not Reform

Unchecked freedoms that exist on the Web despite the government's filtering efforts may be ushering in an age of social change.

Originally from
ReBlogged by ann p on Mar 8, 2006 at 08:32 AM | Comments (0)

Chair tattoos

David Pescovitz:
 History Tattoo 5
Tattoo artist Nick Baxter has done some beautiful needle-and-ink renderings of designer chairs.
Link (via Daddy Types)

Originally from
ReBlogged by ann p on Mar 8, 2006 at 08:27 AM | Comments (0)

Abortion now a crime in South Dakota

Xeni Jardin: From the BBC news item:
Under the law signed by South Dakota Governor Mike Rounds, doctors could get up to five years in prison and a $5,000 (£2,800) fine for performing an illegal abortion. (...) The organisation Planned Parenthood, which runs South Dakota's only abortion clinic, immediately said it would challenge the new law.

The abortion ban would take effect on 1 July but it is likely that a federal judge would suspend it during any legal challenge.

The law would therefore not take effect unless South Dakota state gets the case to the US Supreme Court and wins.

on the way? Women reading this blog might want to check out this helpful and informative link now, and bookmark this one for later. (via Warren)

Originally from
ReBlogged by ann p on Mar 8, 2006 at 08:24 AM | Comments (0)

March 07, 2006

Meet the World flags

Meet the World

Originally from
ReBlogged by ann p on Mar 7, 2006 at 07:54 PM | Comments (0)

The Unseen Video

This is quite cool...

A web-based music video that uses weather and local time of the viewer to dynamically effect the motion graphic. I'm personally not so hot about either the music or the graphics, but good visualization of ambient data anyway.

http://www.theunseenvideo.com/

Originally from
ReBlogged by ann p on Mar 7, 2006 at 05:25 PM | Comments (0)

Flipbook! bug fix

As of now, special characters will not fail to encode correctly at save time.
This was an embarrasing bug i meant to fix some time ago. So far i got it to work with Roman character sets.

As always report any malfunctions at

flipbook
at
piterwilson
dot
com

Originally from
ReBlogged by juan ospina on Mar 7, 2006 at 04:01 PM | Comments (3)

Shit We're Diggin' - The Photographs of Alexandre Orion

fecalbra.jpg

From one of our favorite websites, Fecal Face, comes a link to METABIOTICS which showcases the art of Alexandre Orion in Brazil. The most interesting thing is that his art is no t the stencils themselves, but rather the photographs that he shoots of people as they pass them by. Good stuff indeed

Originally from
ReBlogged by ann p on Mar 7, 2006 at 11:32 AM | Comments (4)

Thailand: huge anti-gov demonstrations, media largely silent

Xeni Jardin:


BoingBoing reader Jit in Thailand says,

Thai television has been notorious for remaining silent when historic events are happening.

Right now history is happening -- a mob is marching on Government House with the intent to overthrow the Thaksin administration.

What is Thai broadcast television showing? This.

Full coverage of the recent unrest is here -- this is what blogs are for!

post about today's demonstrations, full blog-coverage here.

Originally from
ReBlogged by ann p on Mar 7, 2006 at 11:28 AM | Comments (4)

Techno Tuesday

7_3_06.jpg

Originally from
ReBlogged by andy rementer on Mar 7, 2006 at 11:26 AM | Comments (9)

Silicon and gold



Bob Kaiser of the company Essential Elements in Silicon Valley mines gold from defunct computers and recycles the rest (1999)

This and more bizarre-life-in-Silicon-Valley photos by Peter Menzel

Originally posted by Anne from Space and Culture, ReBlogged by perry on Mar 6, 2006 at 04:07 PM

well, whatdya know? the 21st century gold mine is still in California...

Originally from
ReBlogged by ann p on Mar 7, 2006 at 11:25 AM | Comments (0)

And the Academy Award goes to....

I guess you could call this a triumph moment in history, when gangsta rapper group Three 6 Mafia gets introduced at the Oscar and actually WON the golden statue award for a song named "It's Hard Out Here for a Pimp", written for the movie 'Hustle and Blow'.

I repeat. These people:

won the Oscar.

They were also the first ever hip-hop group to perform at the Academy Awards show.

I mean, good for them, sure, but this kind of raises eyebrows as to why they were chosen as opposed to, oh, I don't know, so many other hip hop groups that don't come across as stereotypes. Do we really have to glorify thug-life and skanky ho's? But hey, you do what works, right?

more stories and comments at village voice, hip-hop music, and Rollingstone.

Just for this, everything else that won the awards became all boring by comparison, except that I kind of like how "Brokeback" will now become the new synonym for man-on-man action. Ha. My sincere tip of the hat to Ang Lee.

Click here for more on the Oscars.

Originally from
ReBlogged by ann p on Mar 7, 2006 at 10:09 AM | Comments (2)

Shit We're Diggin' - The Photographs of Alexandre Orion

fecalbra.jpg

From one of our favorite websites, Fecal Face, comes a link to METABIOTICS which showcases the art of Alexandre Orion in Brazil. The most interesting thing is that his art is no t the stencils themselves, but rather the photographs that he shoots of people as they pass them by. Good stuff indeed

Originally from
ReBlogged by ann p on Mar 7, 2006 at 05:32 AM | Comments (0)

Thailand: huge anti-gov demonstrations, media largely silent

Xeni Jardin:


BoingBoing reader Jit in Thailand says,

Thai television has been notorious for remaining silent when historic events are happening.

Right now history is happening -- a mob is marching on Government House with the intent to overthrow the Thaksin administration.

What is Thai broadcast television showing? This.

Full coverage of the recent unrest is here -- this is what blogs are for!

post about today's demonstrations, full blog-coverage here.

Originally from
ReBlogged by ann p on Mar 7, 2006 at 05:28 AM | Comments (0)

Silicon and gold



Bob Kaiser of the company Essential Elements in Silicon Valley mines gold from defunct computers and recycles the rest (1999)

This and more bizarre-life-in-Silicon-Valley photos by Peter Menzel

Originally posted by Anne from Space and Culture, ReBlogged by perry on Mar 6, 2006 at 04:07 PM

Originally from
ReBlogged by ann p on Mar 7, 2006 at 05:25 AM | Comments (0)

March 05, 2006

Natalie Portman as Gangsta Rapper

Wow, this video is so good I'm posting to this blog on a Sunday evening. An SNL digital short featuring Natalie Portman...

Natalie Portman Gangsta Rapper

She rocks! I mean rap! I mean.. man, she's good.

Originally from
ReBlogged by ann p on Mar 5, 2006 at 07:28 PM | Comments (4)

March 04, 2006

Quick update

Just wanted to announce two quick updates to Flipbook! Thank you all for your e-mails telling me about the features you want to see. Flipbook! is nowhere to finished so please continue to send me all you wishes and comments to flipbook at piterwilson dot com

1-"Randomize" link on Gallery page: With this link you can see a list of random animations on the gallery, not just the newest ones.

2-A new preference has been added to the "preferences" page that lets you pick wheter the animations open on a new window or not.

All the other things you have been asking are on the works, so keep on flippin'

Originally from
ReBlogged by juan ospina on Mar 4, 2006 at 01:28 PM | Comments (0)

March 03, 2006

Flickr Friday

Fabrica photo of the week:

Aren't they cute?

Originally from
ReBlogged by ann p on Mar 3, 2006 at 01:12 PM | Comments (1)

The super heros of bad style

Earlier this week, the NYT had a very good article about digital self-portraits that the kids of this generation are crazy about, and especially mentioned this phenomenon happening on MySpace. I blogged the article on Art.Report and flagged it for future reference material.

Today I find a hilarious web project base on this very topic, created back in 2004, and it's so funny i almost pee in my pants:

title1.jpg

He's also done a second annual award, which is just as pricelessly good.

Originally from
ReBlogged by ann p on Mar 3, 2006 at 12:56 PM | Comments (2)

The Art of Detouch

Like a good plastic surgeon, the best photo retouch artists never leave a trace of their cuts and fills when they make bodies more seductive. But thanks to a project developed by members of OpenLab, Eyebeam's research and development fellowship program for technology projects, the unseen work of the retouch artist is coming back to haunt perfected images. 'The Art of Detouch' is an application that generates a pixel-by-pixel comparison of a picture before and after retouching. It then isolates and displays the altered elements using transitional animations and multiple color codes to indicate the location and intensity of the digital nips and tucks. The silhouettes that result are ghostly outlines of excess hair, skin, and clothing that were removed during the retouch process. The project contains a strong element of social critique--it draws attention to the heavy manipulation that goes into representations of the female body--but its real brilliance is measured by how mesmerizing the animated visualizations are to watch.

Originally from Rhizome.org

Originally from
ReBlogged by silvia on Mar 3, 2006 at 12:45 PM | Comments (0)

March 02, 2006

Analog CD Holders

cd_huellen.jpg

These paper CD holders are very clever (and fall into the "why didn't I think of that?" category). The die-cut sihouettes of a turntable and a manual camera utilizes the center hole of the CD to depict a camera lens and a vinyl record. Simple but great design.

From Polyshop.

thursday is design day...

Originally from
ReBlogged by ann p on Mar 2, 2006 at 11:43 AM | Comments (0)

scubdoo - underwater scooter

ScubadoosideshotYou are seated on your ScubaDoo, with your head and shoulders within a clear dome, your air constantly replenished from the external compressor, enabling you to breathe normally! At a rate of 2.5 knots you’re able to ride amongst the spectacular underwater world, or remain stationary while you feed the fish.

ScubaDoo - underwater scooter

(via byrdhouse)

Originally from
ReBlogged by ann p on Mar 2, 2006 at 11:41 AM | Comments (3)

leitmotiv rack

Coathanger_largeA witty alternative to the traditional means of hanging your coats and hats... Designed by Tonko Van Dijk, this will be a discussion point for any visitors.

Leitmotiv Rack

Originally from
ReBlogged by ann p on Mar 2, 2006 at 11:39 AM | Comments (0)

wine labels | julia hoffmann

Wine

When it comes to buying wine, I am all about the labels. I can't help it. Call it 'deformation professsionelle!" Especially since G and I mounted the very-very cool wine tube in our kitchen, which prominently displays the bottles. I wish that these bottles (image) would go into production. They are the brainchild of über-talented german designer Julia Hoffmann, who works at Pentagram, here in NYC.

pretty..

Originally from
ReBlogged by ann p on Mar 2, 2006 at 11:36 AM | Comments (1)

Analog CD Holders

cd_huellen.jpg

These paper CD holders are very clever (and fall into the "why didn't I think of that?" category). The die-cut sihouettes of a turntable and a manual camera utilizes the center hole of the CD to depict a camera lens and a vinyl record. Simple but great design.

From Polyshop.

Originally from
ReBlogged by ann p on Mar 2, 2006 at 05:43 AM | Comments (0)

scubdoo - underwater scooter

ScubadoosideshotYou are seated on your ScubaDoo, with your head and shoulders within a clear dome, your air constantly replenished from the external compressor, enabling you to breathe normally! At a rate of 2.5 knots you’re able to ride amongst the spectacular underwater world, or remain stationary while you feed the fish.

ScubaDoo - underwater scooter

(via byrdhouse)

Originally from
ReBlogged by ann p on Mar 2, 2006 at 05:41 AM | Comments (0)

leitmotiv rack

Coathanger_largeA witty alternative to the traditional means of hanging your coats and hats... Designed by Tonko Van Dijk, this will be a discussion point for any visitors.

Leitmotiv Rack

Originally from
ReBlogged by ann p on Mar 2, 2006 at 05:39 AM | Comments (0)

wine labels | julia hoffmann

Wine

When it comes to buying wine, I am all about the labels. I can't help it. Call it 'deformation professsionelle!" Especially since G and I mounted the very-very cool wine tube in our kitchen, which prominently displays the bottles. I wish that these bottles (image) would go into production. They are the brainchild of über-talented german designer Julia Hoffmann, who works at Pentagram, here in NYC.

Originally from
ReBlogged by ann p on Mar 2, 2006 at 05:36 AM | Comments (1)

March 01, 2006

14 Days, 7 Artists, 103 Meters of Canvas in Milan

milanop1.jpg

Last week we posted a series of amazing canvases done in Milan over 14 days by seven artists: Kami, Sasu, alexone , Will Barras, Jago, Microbo and Bo130.

From Bo130 comes some panaramas of the entire 105 meters long 2.5 high, 14 days, 7 people.

Click here to see the first panel
Click here to see the second panel

Originally from
ReBlogged by ann p on Mar 1, 2006 at 12:56 PM | Comments (14)

Knitta — Graffiti by Knit One, Pearl One*

Knitta.jpg

“Knitta began in August 2005, when AKrylik and PolyCotN were discussing their frustration over unfinished knitting projects: half-knitted sweaters and balls of yarn gathering dust. That afternoon, they knitted their first doorknob cozy. Then it dawned on them… A tag crew of knitters, bombing the inner city with vibrant, stitched works of art, wrapped around everything from beer bottles on easy nights to public monuments and utility poles on more ambitious outings. With a mix of clandestine moves and gangsta rap — Knitta was born! Today, Knitta is a group of more than 10 ladies of all ages, races, nationalities, religions, sexual orientation… and gender.” What more is there one can say, ‘cept we happened by this link whilst visiting a funky new DIY Craft blog, that only started up at the beginning of this month. ::Knitta, via Whip It Up

awesome!

Originally from
ReBlogged by ann p on Mar 1, 2006 at 12:48 PM | Comments (3)

The World's Highest Eco Station

mount-everest2.jpg

Where’s the best place to measure all the pollution blowing in from smog-producing factories in China and India? How about Mount Everest, the world’s highest mountain. This month, Italy opened an eco station on Everest’s 16,600-foot level, as reported by the ANSA news agency. The Italians carted 18 tons of equipment up the mountain by hand—a feat necessary due to the sensitivity of the measuring devices.

Italians? really??

Originally from
ReBlogged by ann p on Mar 1, 2006 at 12:46 PM | Comments (3)

ChangeX - Student eXhibition on Design for Change

ChangeX.jpg

“CHANGEX is an annual exhibition of student art + design works that address issues of sustainability, environmental responsibility, social equity and community. Now in its third year, the [2006] exhibition will be complemented by an expanded series of events of interest to young designers, professionals, and community members alike. Works showcased in the exhibition have been drawn from a wide range of design fields including industrial design, architecture and interiors, landscape, textiles, graphics, installation and multimedia. Retaining its emphasis on recent graduates, this year’s exhibitors will also include high school students and current students from [across five Sydney Universities.] These diverse projects approach design as a tool for satisfying genuine human needs in ways that are both practical and imaginative, challenging the conventional expectations of the design industry and extending the boundaries of their discipline.” The party commences Friday 3 March 2006. Come one, come all. ::ChangeX

for those of us in australia

Originally from
ReBlogged by ann p on Mar 1, 2006 at 12:45 PM | Comments (0)

Hummer - Can't Buy Me Love

TransAm_3 copy.jpg

The Smashing Pumpkins said "no thanks," the Talking Heads gracefully declined, electronic rockers Trans Am told them to hit the road - and my guess is that if they were still around, the Beatles would have said no too. It seems as though Hummer is in the rather unusual position of being unable to pay artists to abandon their values to endorse a product that pretty much represents all that is f*cked in the modern world.

yeah, take that! hummer!

Originally from
ReBlogged by ann p on Mar 1, 2006 at 12:44 PM | Comments (0)

14 Days, 7 Artists, 103 Meters of Canvas in Milan

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Last week we posted a series of amazing canvases done in Milan over 14 days by seven artists: Kami, Sasu, alexone , Will Barras, Jago, Microbo and Bo130.

From Bo130 comes some panaramas of the entire 105 meters long 2.5 high, 14 days, 7 people.

Click here to see the first panel
Click here to see the second panel

Originally from
ReBlogged by ann p on Mar 1, 2006 at 06:56 AM | Comments (2)

Knitta — Graffiti by Knit One, Pearl One*

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“Knitta began in August 2005, when AKrylik and PolyCotN were discussing their frustration over unfinished knitting projects: half-knitted sweaters and balls of yarn gathering dust. That afternoon, they knitted their first doorknob cozy. Then it dawned on them… A tag crew of knitters, bombing the inner city with vibrant, stitched works of art, wrapped around everything from beer bottles on easy nights to public monuments and utility poles on more ambitious outings. With a mix of clandestine moves and gangsta rap — Knitta was born! Today, Knitta is a group of more than 10 ladies of all ages, races, nationalities, religions, sexual orientation… and gender.” What more is there one can say, ‘cept we happened by this link whilst visiting a funky new DIY Craft blog, that only started up at the beginning of this month. ::Knitta, via Whip It Up

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ReBlogged by ann p on Mar 1, 2006 at 06:48 AM | Comments (0)

The World's Highest Eco Station

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Where’s the best place to measure all the pollution blowing in from smog-producing factories in China and India? How about Mount Everest, the world’s highest mountain. This month, Italy opened an eco station on Everest’s 16,600-foot level, as reported by the ANSA news agency. The Italians carted 18 tons of equipment up the mountain by hand—a feat necessary due to the sensitivity of the measuring devices.

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ReBlogged by ann p on Mar 1, 2006 at 06:46 AM | Comments (0)

ChangeX - Student eXhibition on Design for Change

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“CHANGEX is an annual exhibition of student art + design works that address issues of sustainability, environmental responsibility, social equity and community. Now in its third year, the [2006] exhibition will be complemented by an expanded series of events of interest to young designers, professionals, and community members alike. Works showcased in the exhibition have been drawn from a wide range of design fields including industrial design, architecture and interiors, landscape, textiles, graphics, installation and multimedia. Retaining its emphasis on recent graduates, this year’s exhibitors will also include high school students and current students from [across five Sydney Universities.] These diverse projects approach design as a tool for satisfying genuine human needs in ways that are both practical and imaginative, challenging the conventional expectations of the design industry and extending the boundaries of their discipline.” The party commences Friday 3 March 2006. Come one, come all. ::ChangeX

Originally from
ReBlogged by ann p on Mar 1, 2006 at 06:45 AM | Comments (0)

Hummer - Can't Buy Me Love

TransAm_3 copy.jpg

The Smashing Pumpkins said "no thanks," the Talking Heads gracefully declined, electronic rockers Trans Am told them to hit the road - and my guess is that if they were still around, the Beatles would have said no too. It seems as though Hummer is in the rather unusual position of being unable to pay artists to abandon their values to endorse a product that pretty much represents all that is f*cked in the modern world.

Originally from
ReBlogged by ann p on Mar 1, 2006 at 06:44 AM | Comments (0)